What’s On!

With its acquisition announced today of 522 prints by Diane Arbus, the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto has become the second biggest holder of her work in the world. As well as adding to the AGOs significant collection of photographywhich includes works by Gary Winogrand, Josef Sudek and Arnold Newmanthe acquisition is notable because before this, the museum owned no works by Arbus. Made possible with funds from the museum patrons Phil Lind, Sandra Simpson, Jay Smith, Jozef Straus, and Robin and David Young, the acquisition comes after a three-year negotiation and was purchased through the Fraenkel Gallery in San Francisco. The collection also has a particular resonance for Toronto, says the museums director and chief executive Stephan Jost, who is a photography historian by training. What fascinates me about Arbus, is how she always talked about photographing the margins of society, Jost says But in Toronto today, these margins have become part of the mainstream and what we celebrate as part of our vibrant diversity. With a view to the forthcoming Pride weekend in Toronto, Jost points to Female impersonators in mirrors, NYC, 1958, as one of the rarely published or exhibited treasures the [...]
Fri, Jun 23, 2017
Source: ART NEWSPAPER
Julia Peyton-Jones, who stepped down as the director of Londons Serpentine Galleries last year after 25 years in the post, is joining Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac in Mayfair as senior global director, the gallery announced on Friday. Peyton-Jones studied painting at the Royal College of Art between 1975 and 78 but did not stay long in that field. At the Serpentine, she pioneered the Pavilion program, which invites international architects and artists to build a structure next to the galleries. The first commission in 2000 was Zaha Hadid, and others have included Ai Weiwei, Jean Nouvel, and Oscar Niemeyer. Her efforts at the non-profit gallery won her an OBE in 2003 and a DBE in 2016. Julia Peyton-Jones is one of the most respected and admired figures in the art world with an unparalleled level of experience," Thaddaeus Ropac said in a statement. "It will be an honour and a joy to work together and develop exciting new projects. She starts at the commercial gallery in September. Ropac has been expanding a great deal lately, and recently announced that Nick Buckley Wood will serve as the gallerys Asia director. The Paris- and Salzberg-based dealer opened a London branch [...]
Fri, Jun 23, 2017
Source: ART NEWSPAPER
City officials in San Francisco have approved plans for a vast new public art park located on Treasure Island and Yerba Buena Island, located in San Francisco bay. The project involves spending at least $50m on works in a variety of media that will be dotted around the 300-acre terrain. The redevelopment of the areawhich is led by the non-profit Treasure Island Development Authority and the city agency, San Francisco Arts Commissionis due to last 20 years. The organisers aim to raise $50m through a 1% for art programme whereby private residential developers meet a fraction of the production and installation costs (up to 8,000 homes form part of the initiative). Treasure Island was built to host the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939, when artists such as the US sculptor Ruth Cravath and the Mexican painter Miguel Covarrubias were commissioned to create works for the Pacific Unity sculpture collection. A cultural legacy for the island will be established by the proliferation of new art projects and the intended reinstallation of the historic Pacific Unity sculpture collection, a project statement says. The island masterplan, which is posted online, includes a curatorial framework for the new [...]
Fri, Jun 23, 2017
Source: ART NEWSPAPER
Shepard Fairey and his team of three assistants were in central Sydney this month, painting Faireys biggest ever mural on an office block wall, when a passer-by approached the Los Angeles-based artist with a man-to-man warning. The women arent going to like that, the man confided to Fairey, indicating the word obey written in huge letters directly below the murals beautiful face. Fairey scratched his chin, and told the man: Well, maybe shes saying obey to the guys. Satisfied, the man wandered off. Several days later, a much larger audience was able to question Fairey when he spoke at Sydney Town Hall on 17 June under the auspices of Vivid Sydney, the annual event organised by the New South Wales government tourism agency, which commissioned the mural. And the artist shared the background to some of his best-know work, as well as his thoughts on the commercialisation of the street art movement. The artist came to prominence in 2008 with his Hope poster, which generated support for Barack Obamas campaign for the US presidency. Having been sued for using an existing press photograph in his design, he said copyright laws should give artists more latitude to [...]
Fri, Jun 23, 2017
Source: ART NEWSPAPER
On 11 January 1753 Sir Hans Sloane died and left his collection to the nation. The Cotton Library, which included very important works such as the Lindisfarne Gospels, a manuscript of Beowulf and two of the four known copies of Magna Carta, had already been left to the state in 1700 by Sir Robert Bruce, Sir Thomas and Sir John Cotton. The Harley manuscript collection, purchased by the government for £10,000, was also in need of a home. These three important collections were to be the founding collection of the British Museum. The British Museum Act of 1753. The opening page of the Act that created the British Museum. On 7 June 1753, the British Museum Act received royal assent. The first meeting of the Trustees of the newly founded British Museum was held on 11 December 1753, at the Cockpit, Whitehall, and their most pressing decision was to choose a suitable repository for this extensive collection. A number of possible properties were considered for this new national collection. A new building within the Palace of Westminster, at an estimated cost of £50,000–60,000, was deemed too expensive and Buckingham House, later to become Buckingham Palace, was also dismissed as too costly, at £30,000, [...]
Fri, Jun 23, 2017
Source: British Museum Blog


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