What’s On!

Beyond its visually rapturous value, the Storm King region also had a pivotal but lesser-known role in the development of US environmental law and policy [...]
Tue, Oct 20, 2020
Source: ART NEWSPAPER
While the top lot of the night—a fiery self-portrait by George Baselitz—struggled to meet its low estimate, a bidding war broke out over Dana Schutz's painting of a bright orange Trump [...]
Tue, Oct 20, 2020
Source: ART NEWSPAPER
In preparation for the upcoming Citi exhibition Arctic: culture and climate, conservators in the Organics conservation lab have come across an array of unexpected and incredible materials used by Arctic Peoples to make everyday objects. Wind- and waterproof translucent parkas made from the intestines of bearded seals, tiny bags intricately sewn from the feet of ducks and harpoon floats used in hunting, made from the bladders of walruses and stomachs of seals, all feature in the new exhibition. Left: a waterpoorf parka made of seal gut; right a bag made from duck feet. The objects – and the materials used to make them – are testimony to the amazing ingenuity of the communities in the circumpolar regions. The people who live in these harsh environments have a respectful relationship with the resources and animals around them. The drive to ensure no part of a slaughtered animal is wasted means that parts of animals that we would usually discard have been beautifully and expertly crafted into the most wonderful materials and objects. A harpoon with a float made of animal bladder. Two objects in particular have piqued the interest of conservators and visitors to the lab alike – two bags made, in the [...]
Tue, Oct 20, 2020
Source: British Museum Blog
Closures, postponements and sharp reductions in programming prompt soul-searching—and innovation—among institutions [...]
Tue, Oct 20, 2020
Source: ART NEWSPAPER


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