What’s On!

Michael Kelly Williams, Wodakota, 2017. Courtesy of the artist. Sedimentations: Assemblage as Social Repair June 21–December 8, 2018 Opening: June 21, 6–8pm, RSVP required to media@sdrubin.org The Shelley & Donald Rubin Foundation The 8th Floor 17 West 17th Street 10011 New York, NY the8thfloor.org Instagram / Facebook / Twitter Share The Shelley & Donald Rubin Foundation is pleased to announce Sedimentations: Assemblage as Social Repair, an exhibition featuring artists who employ strategies of reuse in their practice, incorporating found and repurposed materials that reference a multitude of timescales and politics. Embedded with narratives of cultural heritage and preservation, technological obsolescence, spiritual engagement, sustainable ecology, the impacts of gun culture, and, more generally, social responsibility, artworks in the exhibition are made from the artifacts of human existence to reinterpret the cycles of creation, consumption, and waste. The title alludes to the late artist Robert Smithson’s 1968 essay “A Sedimentation of the Mind: Earth Projects,” in which he draws a connection between flows of thought and the shifting earth, making a case against artistic refinement in favor of the ever-changing qualities of a material’s natural state. While Smithson was proposing this approach for the production of earth works, his proposition is echoed in the material reuse that connects many of the artworks in the [...]
Thu, May 24, 2018
Source: Art Agenda Announcements
Peter Halley, 2018. Preparatory sketch. Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Xippas. Peter Halley AU-DESSOUS / AU-DESSUS June 9–July 28, 2018 Opening: June 9, 3–8pm Galerie Xippas 108 rue Vieille du Temple 75003 Paris France Hours: Tuesday–Friday 10am–1pm, Tuesday–Friday 2–7pm, Saturday 10am–7pm T +33 1 40 27 05 55 info@xippas.com www.xippas.com Facebook / Instagram Share Curated by Jill Gasparina Peter Halley says of his paintings that they are images of something. He has found his role models in pop and minimalism, with Barnett Newman, Frank Stella and Andy Warhol, instead of the canonical—and European—history of abstraction, which he has been a fierce critic of ever since his first writings at the beginning of the 1980s. In this tension between abstract and figurative work, architecture occupies an important place. His practice of geometric abstraction is, indeed, inseparable from his take on the city of New York, where he grew up. In 1991, he described it as a “huge, very abstract, very overscale undifferentiated grid,”[1] thereby casting the city as a matrix upon which to base his work. Since the 1980s, the painter has integrated materials and motifs drawn from architecture into his pictorial lexicon. “Cells,” “prisons,” and “conduits,” found in his work from 1981 onwards, are therefore the product of a reflection on the geometricisation of the social space, inspired by the [...]
Thu, May 24, 2018
Source: Art Agenda Announcements
June 6–24, 2018 [...]
Wed, May 23, 2018
Source: MoMA Upcoming Film Exhibitions
An excellent show add new strands to our understanding of what makes American art uniquely American [...]
Wed, May 23, 2018
Source: ART NEWSPAPER


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