What’s On!

The artist, whose work is causing a stir at Art Basel, aims to keep alive conversations on the toxic nature of power that sparked the feminist social movement [...]
Thu, Jun 13, 2019
Source: ART NEWSPAPER
Curator Gianni Jetzer shares the highlights of his eighth—and final— edition [...]
Thu, Jun 13, 2019
Source: ART NEWSPAPER
Manga is a Japanese visual form of storytelling that employs the power of line to draw the reader into the story. Although manga’s roots are international, the form as we know it today developed in Japan in the late 19th and 20th centuries and has recently achieved global status. Out of the hundreds of genres, we’ve picked eight key genres explored in the Citi exhibition Mangaマンガ . Come and find your manga! Shôjo manga (少女マンガ) Shôjo manga is targeted at girls up to the age of 18 and focuses on romance, friendship and comedy. Drawing is idealised, with emotions conveyed through large, expressive eyes and symbols such as flowers. Although the main target audience for shôjo manga is girls, boys read it as well and it can be drawn by both male and female artists. One of the pioneers of shôjo manga is Tezuka Osamu with his classic series Princess Knight, which tells the story of Sapphire, who was destined to be a girl but was mistakenly also given a male heart by a naughty angel named Tink. Gender identity issues come fast and furious in the ensuing pages of this compelling story. Tezuka Osamu (1928–1989), Princess Knight, 1953–1956, 1963–1966. © Tezuka Productions. Josei manga (女性マンガ) Josei manga [...]
Mon, Jun 03, 2019
Source: British Museum Blog
The British Museum is a monthly podcast made available to ‘all studious and curious persons’. Comedian, podcaster and super-fan Iszi Lawrence (the Z List Dead List) presents snippets from exclusive Members’ lectures at the Museum, artfully woven together with her own musings. Please share your comments and feedback about the podcast! You can talk to us on Twitter @britishmuseum using the hashtag #membercast or email friends@britishmuseum.org [...]
Fri, May 31, 2019
Source: British Museum Blog
One of the star objects in Reimagining Captain Cook: Pacific perspectives is this ‘chief mourner’s costume’ from Tahiti, in the Society Islands. The costume (known as a heva) was worn during the mourning ceremonies following the death of a chief in 18th-century Tahiti, and is one of the most important objects in the British Museum’s collections. Collected by Cook in 1774, the outfit is believed to be one of approximately ten he brought to Europe in 1775. Today, only a handful survive, making the British Museum’s near complete assemblage an important document of a now-lost Tahitian practice – particularly in light of the exciting discoveries that were made during conservation. It is constructed from a range of ritually significant materials –barkcloth (a material made from tree bark), pearl shell, feather, coconut shell, plaited coconut fibre. For many years the costume stood ‘dressed’ on a painter’s easel, which posed the first conservation questions. The costume displayed on its old mount before extensive conservation Records show the costume was displayed on the easel in the Museum’s South Seas galleries in the early 19th century, and the use of plaited coconut fibre string to tie elements onto the easel suggested that it might have [...]
Fri, May 31, 2019
Source: British Museum Blog


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