What’s On!

The British Museum works in partnership with more than 250 cultural organisations based all over the UK as part of its National Programmes scheme. We collaborate with partners to share collections through touring exhibitions and loans. Because of this, more than 10.5 million people had the chance to see objects from our collection outside of London. National Programmes also share training and skills development for sector professionals through our Knowledge Share Programme, for the public through the Portable Antiquities Scheme, and for young people through our Youth Collective and our paid traineeships. The Museum Futures programme will provide year-long paid training placements for 27 young people (primarily 18–24 year olds) at over 21 partner organisations and at the British Museum. Through on-the-job training in digital skills related to museum collections, we aim to equip trainees with the necessary knowledge and experience to pursue a career in museums, or in the wider cultural sector. Trainees are recruited locally by each host partner, and digital projects vary from photography and 3D scanning of objects to online engagement through social media to data management and preservation. All roles are aimed at new entrants to the sector, and we encourage applicants without undergraduate degrees and [...]
Fri, Jun 26, 2020
Source: British Museum Blog
To celebrate Pride month our LGBTQ tour volunteers – and others who have helped our volunteers to research these histories in the collection – have selected objects with an LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer) connection from the Museum’s collection to share with you. During 2018 and 2019 the British Museum partnership exhibition Desire, Love, Identity: exploring LGBTQ histories visited five venues across the UK. Each added objects from their own collections and communities to the show, highlighting local LGBTQ histories and connections. Colleagues from Norwich Millennium Library and Bolton Museum have also shared some of their favourite objects from their version of the exhibition below. Figures of Castor and Pollux – Chris Weston, LGBTQ Tour Volunteer, British Museum Group of Castor and Pollux made in the Meissen Porcelain Factory. Unglazed porcelain, moulded, 1788–1789. I am fascinated by this little 1780s Meissen porcelain group, which, beneath its unimpeachable credentials as fine art copied from a classical original, seethes with queerness. The Prado Museum in Madrid calls the life-sized original that inspired this work Orestes and Pylades after an 18th-century interpretation of the work as two mythical Greek princes. The 2nd-century poet Lucian (c. AD 125–180) viewed them as ideal lovers, who ‘taking a god [...]
Fri, Jun 26, 2020
Source: British Museum Blog
Food has been central to social life throughout human history. In the classical world it was part of occasions from religious rites to ostentatious parties. There is plenty of information available on what the ancient Greeks and Romans ate and drank – in written texts and in archaeological finds – which can help us bring their gastronomical creations to life in the 21st century. Here we have compiled a few recipes from the ancient world, which you can recreate at home to make your own classical feast! These recipes are from The Classical Cookbook, by Andrew Dalby and Sally Grainger, which uses Greek and Latin texts to create dishes from Homeric Greece to the Roman Empire. Athenian stamnos (storage jar) showing men at a symposion. Greek. 450–440 BC. Starters, sides and snacks 1) Cabbage the Athenian way (vg) Bronze grater. Greek. 5th century BC. ‘Cabbage should be sliced with the sharpest possible iron blade, then washed, drained, and chopped with plenty of coriander and rue. Then sprinkle with honey vinegar and add just a little bit of silphium. Incidentally, you can eat this as a meze.’ – Mnesitheus, quoted in Oribasius, Medical Collections 4, 4, 1 This is a popular recipe among Greek and Roman writers. Oribasius [...]
Thu, Jun 18, 2020
Source: British Museum Blog
Events following the death of George Floyd have motivated the creative industries to look within, but many galleries and cultural institutions have stayed deafeningly silent. How can they move forward? Curator and writer Aindrea Emelife writes a powerful mission statement [...]
Sat, Jun 13, 2020
Source: Independent art
Location The bustling city of Thebes, which is known to the locals as ‘Waset’, lies around 800 kilometres (500 miles) south of the Mediterranean on the banks of the river Nile. Thebes is the main city of ‘Upper Egypt’, the southern region of the country that extends to Nubia. The Egyptian king (or pharaoh) rules over both Upper Egypt and Lower Egypt, with both areas defined by the course of the River Nile. Two views of the ruins of Thebes. Vue des Ruines de Thebes a Karnaq (top) and Autre Vue de Karnaq (bottom). Anthony Cardon. After Baron Dominique Vivant Denon. Etching with engraving. Around 1802. The city has recently been the focus of a significant building programme under the reigning king Ramesses II, with monumental new constructions for the gods. Residential areas, temples, festival sites, government buildings, and industrial areas are found on either side of the Nile, with vast cemeteries in the low hills of the West bank. When to visit Thebes is one of the driest and hottest areas in Egypt, and temperatures can be sweltering throughout the summer months. If you have to visit during this time, be prepared for some serious heat! During the Nile flood, which reaches Thebes in [...]
Fri, Jun 12, 2020
Source: British Museum Blog


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