What’s On!

For Sondra Perry’s solo exhibition at Bridget Donahue, New York, all the walls are painted Rosco Chroma Key Blue. The deeply saturated color is used on television sets and in the production of special effects for movies and videogames because it contrasts so profoundly with most human skin colors. Chroma Key Blue is the obverse of the color of being, Sondra Perry pointed out to me at the opening. No human skin exists in an adjacent shade, and so it can be used as the negative space onto which context for any body can be manufactured and projected. The color of ultimate negativity, or the absence of existence. Perry’s interest in the condition of visibility is influenced in part by Simone Browne’s Dark Matters: On the Surveillance of Blackness (2015), which analyzes the way people of color are visualized using surveillance technologies and, through this visualization, de-humanized.(1) Browne traces the containment of blackness from basic technologies, such as branding and lantern laws, to more technically advanced forms used in contemporary policing. Black bodies are often represented in the aforementioned visualization techniques against a ground very similar to Rosco Chroma Key Blue: one of the conditions of their visibility since slavery has been [...]
Wed, Jan 31, 2018
Source: Art Agenda Reviews
Live screening – The Mediterranean and Atlantic from prehistory to AD 1500 The British Museum Membercast is a monthly podcast made available to ‘all studious and curious persons’. Comedian, podcaster and super-fan Iszi Lawrence (The Z List Dead List) presents snippets from exclusive Members’ lectures at the Museum, artfully woven together with interviews and her own musings. Please share your comments and feedback about the podcast! You can talk to us on Twitter @britishmuseum using the hashtag #membercast or email friends@britishmuseum.org [...]
Wed, Jan 31, 2018
Source: British Museum Blog
In the basement of a former Berlin crematorium, a small brass instrument sputters and hisses. The sculpture—Vartan Avakian’s Composition With A Recurring Sound (2016)—could be the baby cousin to a trumpet or saxophone. It is also the closest this group exhibition about rhythm gets to danceability. No surprise there. SAVVY is a space that emphasizes colloquy, meaning that its exhibitions and programs often seem less concerned with a central subject than that subject’s relation to a lived world. This exhibition concludes a program that extended into Berlin’s HAU theater and in 2016–2017 to Lagos, Düsseldorf, Harare, and Hamburg. It suggests an ad-hoc social nervous system, situating a willing viewer between the uncertainty of thinking and the affirmation of feeling. The exhibition’s conceit is that artists can elucidate the unseen rhythms that structure life, while the rest of us—by implication—are bewitched by so many abstractions and constructs: work, finance, love… Not suffering from humility, this theme becomes modestly obliging in function: a discursive matrix interlinking the work. IQhiya—a collective of South African women artists—has modeled the possibility of questioning power through lines of free-association inquiry that one might liken to beats in social space. Monday (2017) is made from school desks covered [...]
Mon, Jan 29, 2018
Source: Art Agenda Reviews
It’s not every day that you get to hold the universe in your hand. The closest that most of us get to this sensation is searching for something on our phones, but for the real deal, there’s nothing quite like an astrolabe. These devices – which range from pocket-sized and practical to weighty presentation pieces – are not only scientific instruments, but also masterpieces of art and design. In October 2018 the Museum will open two new galleries – the Albukhary Foundation Galleries of the Islamic world. On display will be a range of scientific material. In preparation for this exciting new development, I’ve been taking a fresh look at astronomy and astrology and wanted to share some of the highlights with you. Nowadays we have an abundance of devices, apps and other information which help us to know where we are, what time it is, and other essentials of everyday life. Before all this, however, was the astrolabe. Astrolabes are complex devices which use several moving parts to turn raw data provided by the user into practical information – in many ways, they were the computers of their time, used to solve problems relating to the position of the sun, stars, planets [...]
Mon, Jan 29, 2018
Source: British Museum Blog
Fri, Jan 26, 2018
Source: MoMA Current Exhibitions


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