What’s On!

April 15–September 9, 2018 [...]
Fri, May 18, 2018
Source: MoMA Current Exhibitions
April 15–September 3, 2018 [...]
Fri, May 18, 2018
Source: MoMA Current Exhibitions
When we think of chocolate, we tend to imagine it in its solid bar form. However, eating chocolate was not in regular production until the mid 19th century (following the invention of Conrad Van Houten’s screw press in 1828). Chocolate was introduced to England around 1600, first and foremost as a drink, and remained popular in that form for over 200 years. The 18th century was hot chocolate’s heyday. The chocolate makers were intertwined with London’s infamous coffeehouse culture, where the beverages were a catalyst for culture, politics and passions. At the coffeehouse you could get a fortifying hot drink, whether that be tea, coffee or chocolate, over which the day’s events and possibilities would be played out. Trade card of Richard Haines, chocolate and cocoa dealer, 1765. 18th-century hot chocolate was more bitter than our modern variations, but still intensely pleasant. Initially made with cocoa liquor (blocks of ground cocoa nibs) and water, it was popularly served with an equal mix of water and milk, spiced with ingredients including cinnamon, sugar, vanilla, chilli, rosewater, honey, pepper, jasmine or even ambergris. Sir Hans Sloane, whose vast collection of objects became the founding collection of the British Museum, is believed to have been the first [...]
Fri, May 18, 2018
Source: British Museum Blog
June 3–September 9, 2018 [...]
Fri, May 18, 2018
Source: MoMA Upcoming Exhibitions
Ongoing [...]
Thu, May 17, 2018
Source: MoMA Current Exhibitions


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